Designs with the main feature ‘labor/value’

People’s Pavilion: 100% geleend

100% borrowed means that there was no screwing, glueing, drilling or sawing. All materials used had to remain intact. The People’s Pavilion was the central meeting point and discussion platform during the first edition of the World Design Event during Dutch Design Week 2017.

Photo: Filip Dujardin

Wood in Progress

Driven by a strong affinity to challenge the industry, the design collective Envisions strives to collaborate with established companies and inspire them to rethink their production processes.

HEY JUTE

A research project which looks at how we can work with, instead of against, the natural quality of jute to create a high-quality sensitive product. Jute is normally used ‘behind the scenes’ and never as aesthetic material.

Recomposed Bamboo

‘Recomposed Bamboo’ investigates the composition of the bamboo tube, and how this structure can be used more efficiently and aesthetically.

Personal Knitwear for everybody

The clothing industry can and must become more sustainable. If an article of clothing meets the specific wishes of the wearer – in terms of fit, material and colour – full clothes racks in shops are unnecessary. Rosanne van der Meer combines 3D knitting with an on-demand system.

Functional 3D Printed Ceramics

More and more materials can be printed in 3D, including clay. Olivier van Herpt built a 3D clay printer. The designer can influence the machine as it prints. And because clay is a changeable material, chance also plays a part in the printing. This gives rise to a craft product created with the latest technology.

BAG2WORKS

No Mad Makers (Floor Nagler and Didi Aaslund) helps refugees on the Greek island of Lesbos to make bags from the sails of boats and the life jackets that are left behind on the beach. The refugees can take the bags with them on their journey through Europe.

Interwoven

Using subterranean templates as moulds, the root systems of plants are channelled, forming a textile-like material. During the growth process the roots conform to the patterns and the root material weaves or braids itself. For her research, Diana Scherer is collaborating with biologists and ecologists of the Radboud University in Nijmegen.

Ripening Rugs

Adrianus Kundert designs rugs that come to life through intensive use. New colours, textures and patterns appear in places where the rug has been used most. Because the rug becomes more beautiful as it wears, it will not be replaced quickly, as happens with normal wear and tear.

The Lenticular Project

Lenticular printing is used to produce an image that changes optically in colour or depth as it moves. Antoine Peters is researching the possibilities of applying this technique to fabric and creating ‘multiple design’ clothing; the colour of the print changes depending on the movements of the wearer or the viewer.

Hollow Tube Technique

Dirk van de Kooij is researching whether recycled materials can be used in a pulverised form, to which auxiliary materials are added directly, making energy-intensive processing of recycled materials unnecessary.

AGF Klasse 3

The goal of this project is to notify people of the AGF Class 3. Potatoes, fruit and vegetables (A,G and F) from this class have a 10 percent deviation or more and are not offered to consumers. Part of the AGF Class 3 is offered to animal feed companies to be used as livestock feed. The majority of these vegetables will disappear immediately on the compost pile. Renée Boute wants to make clear to consumers that there is nothing wrong with these products. She incorporated this objective in a cooking book that shows in a tasty way that fruits and vegetables from the AGF Class 3 do not belong on the compost pile.

SandBank

The glass industry uses only white, pure sand for the manufacturing of glass. This type of sand can only be found in a small number of sand quarries around the world. As part of the Sandbank project, Atelier NL is experimenting with various local, non-pure types of sand. Types of sand from different locations produce different colours, patterns, and textures.
Sand from different locations produces different colors, patterns, and textures. Melted in the oven the sands fracture, foam, and harden into crystallization patterns. With SandBank Atelier NL explores the potential of these new material variations.

Photo: Mike Roelofs

Coleoptera

In the Netherlands, mealworms are grown for the food industry. Now mainly as food for animals; in the future also for people. The mealworm originates from the mealworm beetle, which dies several months after laying eggs. Growers see these beetles as waste and throw them away. In order to reduce waste and reuse natural resources, Aagje Hoekstra examined how the beetles could be given a second life, as part of her graduation project at the Utrecht School of the Arts (HKU).

Black Gold

Quintus Kropholler ‘s Black Gold collection includes items made of asphalt. Asphalt consists of stone and bitumen. Bitumen is the material that is left over after the processing of crude oil. With this project, Kropholler wants to change the perception of the material. Unlike plastic and gasoline, this petroleum product has a long life and will probably outlive its source (petroleum). Kropholler also demonstrates that asphalt has an aesthetic value.

Mycelium Project

With the Mycelium Project, Studio Eric Klarenbeek aims to offer an alternative to plastics and bioplastics in the relatively young market of 3D printing. The chair is printed with mycelium, a network of hyphae. Instead of melting layers of plastic together, Eric Klarenbeek uses mycelium as ‘living glue. The basic raw material is vegetable waste.

Pendant lights

One in four trees has a fungus. The mould-infested trees are not put on the timber market and are usually cut up in the shredder. Milo Dool gives this waste wood a new destination in his Pendant Light design; the lamps are made of mouldy beech wood.

Invert Footwear

The Invert Footwear collection consists of pairs of different brands of sneakers and flip-flops. For example, Elisa van Joolen turned sample models of Nike skate sneakers inside out and created new matching soles made of flip-flops. The Nike sole became new sandals. Each pair of shoes is unique.