Designs with the main feature ‘firmness’

Plasma Rock

Landfill waste is transformed into energy with the only by-product being the Plasma Rock.
The quality of this nearly undiscovered and non-toxic material is that it is mechanically strong, dense and environmentally stable. Besides the aesthetic differences (Plasma Rock can be green or black), the rocks have differences in the number of elements, depending on the type of waste.

HEY JUTE

A research project which looks at how we can work with, instead of against, the natural quality of jute to create a high-quality sensitive product. Jute is normally used ‘behind the scenes’ and never as aesthetic material.

The New Age of Trichology

An innovative and sustainable research project, where human hair waste is recycled and applied in material and productdesign. The project focuses on the high tensile strength of hair.

Lithoplast

Lithoplast is a new composite material that brings to life a speculative and scientific-based research into the future of plastic pollution and how it hybridizes into a new material in the geological strata of the earth. The name Lithoplast suggests its abilities: Lithos- meaning ‘stone’, and Plast, meaning ‘capable of being shaped or molded’.

Photo: Alan Boom

Personal Knitwear for everybody

The clothing industry can and must become more sustainable. If an article of clothing meets the specific wishes of the wearer – in terms of fit, material and colour – full clothes racks in shops are unnecessary. Rosanne van der Meer combines 3D knitting with an on-demand system.

The Growing Lab – Mycelia

Fungi are micro-organisms that consist of many extremely small and fast-growing hyphal threads. Grow the fungi on the right substrate and a new, strong material will form, which can take on any three-dimensional form. The Growing Lab is an ongoing research project into the possibilities of using fungi for design and architecture.

The Salt Pup

A mixture of almost 90 percent sea salt, a small about of starch and water is heated and dried, leaving a white, hard, translucent material. The material is strong under compression force and weak under tensile force. The logical shape that follows from this is an arch or dome.

Virtual Paper

The world of materials is bigger than the material world. Using algorithms, computers can simulate the natural characteristics of materials. Ontwerper Borgart uses an algorithm developed by the University of California at Berkeley to simulate the characteristics of paper.

Printhesis

A prosthetic arm can be heavy, expensive and uncomfortable, as was discovered by a jewellery maker who had lost her arm and was fitted for a prosthesis. Roel Deden developed an attachment for her that is more of tool than a replacement of a body part.

Hollow Tube Technique

Dirk van de Kooij is researching whether recycled materials can be used in a pulverised form, to which auxiliary materials are added directly, making energy-intensive processing of recycled materials unnecessary.

Phygital Virtuosity

Bastiaan de Nennie merges the digital and physical worlds. Objects from the pre-digital age are scanned, the scans are dissected and the components are used as building blocks for new digital creations. Objects are reused in a digital workshop, in a manner of speaking.

SandBank

The glass industry uses only white, pure sand for the manufacturing of glass. This type of sand can only be found in a small number of sand quarries around the world. As part of the Sandbank project, Atelier NL is experimenting with various local, non-pure types of sand. Types of sand from different locations produce different colours, patterns, and textures.
Sand from different locations produces different colors, patterns, and textures. Melted in the oven the sands fracture, foam, and harden into crystallization patterns. With SandBank Atelier NL explores the potential of these new material variations.

Photo: Mike Roelofs

Mycelium Project

With the Mycelium Project, Studio Eric Klarenbeek aims to offer an alternative to plastics and bioplastics in the relatively young market of 3D printing. The chair is printed with mycelium, a network of hyphae. Instead of melting layers of plastic together, Eric Klarenbeek uses mycelium as ‘living glue. The basic raw material is vegetable waste.

BB. Platform

The basis for the development of textiles by byBorre lies in the mattress industry and the circular knitting machine. Utilizing the technique used in the mattress industry, in which thick fabrics are knitted with filling yarn, Borre has rewritten the programmes for the machines.

Invert Footwear

The Invert Footwear collection consists of pairs of different brands of sneakers and flip-flops. For example, Elisa van Joolen turned sample models of Nike skate sneakers inside out and created new matching soles made of flip-flops. The Nike sole became new sandals. Each pair of shoes is unique.

Protective Underwear

For her graduation project at the Design Academy in Eindhoven, Julia Veldhuijzen van Zanten sought inspiration in the fact that more and more older people want to stay independent for as long as possible, and she started focusing on the emotional and ecological impact of a common problem: worldwide, one in four women and one in eight men have to cope with some degree of incontinence. That’s about 200 million people.

CaCO3 Stoneware

Inspired by the growth of stalactites, Laura Lynn Jansen and Thomas Vailly have found a way to ‘grow’ stone in different forms. Their design series, CaCO3 Stoneware, consists of objects grown around structures drop by drop. The fragile skeleton, a 3D-printed structure, undergoes a petrification process that lasts many weeks in specially chosen thermo-mineral springs with a high calcium carbonate content, also known as CaCO3.

Photo: Floor Knaapen

No-ink

In North-Holland, thousands of hectares of tulips are decapitated in May to retain the energy in the tulip bulb. Tulip growers do nothing with the tulip heads. With No-ink, Tjeerd Veenhoven has developed a process to give this flow of residual tulip heads a new purpose. First, the tulip heads are dried in a large rotating drum in the studio and then the stems and pistils are removed. The tulip’s petals remain.